Methodology – The Pragmora Process

CONFLICT RESOLUTION METHODOLOGY

THE PRAGMORA PROCESS PRODUCES TANGIBLE RESULTS

The Pragmora Process is a unique rigorous research and analytic methodology that identifies those nonviolent interventions that are most likely to contribute substantially to conflict resolution if implemented and are likely to be implemented if effectively advocated. Integral to the Process is putting the selected intervention options into the hands of the right decision-makers, influencers and activists globally.

This is not an academic exercise. The goal of the Pragmora Process is not conflict analysis or root cause analysis, nor is it to make recommendations on what “should” be done.

The goal of the Pragmora Process is to actually help resolve armed conflicts, prevent conflict development or escalation, and stabilize peace in post-conflict regions. Effectiveness is built right into the methodology to maximize the likelihood that the research and analysis will produce real world results.

From research in remote villages to influence on the international stage.

STEP 1. CREATE CONFLICT TIMELINE

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STEP 2. IDENTIFY KEY ISSUES SUSTAINING THE CONFLICT / SUPPORTIVE OF PEACE

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STEP 3. INVENTORY ALL SUGGESTED NON-VIOLENT CONFLICT RESOLUTION MEASURES

STEP 4. APPLY THREE EVALUATION CRITERIA TO ELIMINATE NON-VIABLE OPTIONS

One core component of The Pragmora Process is the creation of an inventory of all suggested non-violent options for resolving the specific conflict. A second is the objective evaluation of the potential effectiveness of each of these options.

Throughout The Pragmora Process, options are vetted by diverse experts–both in the conflict region and internationally, using 3 evaluation criteria. It is important to hear the opinions of individual experts, but to determine the best policy options a comprehensive comparative analyses of those expert views is needed. The final selection of options to include in an advocacy campaign is informed by the Harvard Negotiation Project’s approach to “Getting to Yes.” //The thinking process behind evaluating the possibility of success is heavily informed by the Harvard Negotiation Project’s approach to “Getting to Yes.”

1. Could advocating this measure do harm?

Is there any way that an international advocacy campaign for this measure or the actual implementation of this measure could exacerbate a conflict, destabilize a situation, put lives at risk, or otherwise do harm?

2. Is there a possibility of success?

What is the likelihood that an international advocacy campaign could successfully influence or pressure decision-makers to implement the measure?

3. If implemented, to what extent would it foster peace?

Would it have a notable impact in helping to resolve the conflict and/or foster a stable peace?

STEP 5. CRITERIA AND CONSIDERATIONS FOR SELECTION OF ACTIONS

The short list of effective advocacy actions must be reduced to 3 – 6 actions for inclusion in a focused, manageable advocacy campaign.

In selecting the final advocacy actions, a number of factors are considered. They include:

  • Don’t duplicate efforts.If there is already an advocacy effort underway on an action, it may be more effective to support and magnify that effort, rather than launch a parallel campaign.
  • Target multiple sets of decision-makers in multiple organizations.The target decision-maker may have the authority to implement a number of the actions on the advocacy list, but an advocacy campaign is more likely to be successful if each decision-maker is asked to do just one thing.
  • Ensure simple clear communications.Can the advocacy measure be made easily understandable for individuals who will participate in the campaign? If not, perhaps it isn’t the best choice for an advocacy campaign.

 From research in remote villages to influence on the international stage… and everywhere in between. 

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2017 09 21 Glenys speech at UN HR Council Geneva 200 x 400